Ordinary days after Pentecost - Reflection - 5-26-16

 Texts for Sunday, May 29, 2016 

 Second Sunday  after Pentecost

 1 Kings 8:22-23, 
 41-43
 Psalm 96:1-9
 Galatians 1:1-12
 Luke 7:1-11


Christmas. Check. 
Easter. Check.
Pentecost. Check.

With Trinity Sunday in the rear-view mirror, we turn to a long winding path of non-holiday Sundays. Lutherans call them the “Sundays after Pentecost”; other denominations call them “Ordinary Time”. They stretch from now until November. During this time, we focus on Jesus’ ministry as well as on his disciples. As I pondered the different names for this season, I’m guessing that “after Pentecost” is a reminder that our discipleship is a part of the bigger picture of “the Church”, and the “ordinary” reminds us that God’s kingdom is found in our ordinary daily life, as is our discipleship.

Green is the color for this longest period of the church year. Lutherans throw in a Reformation holiday at the end of October (red) and most churches celebrate “All Saints’ Sunday” in November (white). Other than that, we are green. Green as in growing in our discipleship and in our call to love the other.

In this year of Luke, the emphasis of this season is that discipleship and the mission of the whole church is focused on God’s reconciliation and healing available to all people, especially to the poor, the stranger, and the outcast. See the reflections from January 20 for a reminder of Luke’s measure of Jesus’ mission.

So, since the season points us to growing and learning as disciples, I invite you to reflect on the text yourself. I provide questions from the “Four Step Method” of Bible study below.


Couldn't resist
Note: The centurion does in fact represent the oppressive power of this region, and yet he seems to be a “good guy” according to the area’s leaders. Cynically, I suspect that he has bought their favor and cooperation by building a synagogue for them – but that is better than battering them into submission, I guess. Toward the end of the story, Jesus seems to be impressed with him as well for his understanding of the authority that Jesus holds.

Read Luke 7:1-10.

Here are your questions: 
     What is God doing in this text?
     Where do I see this working in my life?
     What new possibility is there for me?
     What would I view differently if I took these words
       seriously?


As always, I’d love to hear your ideas in the comment section below. But do consider the questions even if you don’t want to discuss it online (in person is also fine). 

For more ways to reflect on these texts, see the G.I.F.T. post for Sunday May 29.

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Written by Pam Larabee-Zierath


Gathered by Grace, Scattered for Service
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